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Lingaraj Temple Bhubaneswar

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Lingaraj Temple is one of the oldest Hindu temples dedicated to Lord Shiva located in Bhubaneswar, the capital of the Indian state of Odisha. The temple is the most visible landmark in Bhubaneswar and one of the state’s most popular tourist destinations.

The Lingaraj temple is Bhubaneswar’s largest temple. The temple’s central tower stands 180 feet (55 metres) tall. The temple embodies the essence of Kalinga architecture, concluding the mediaeval stages of the architectural tradition in Bhubaneswar. The temple is thought to have been built by kings of the Somavamsi dynasty, with later additions by Ganga rulers.

Significance of Lingaraj Temple

The Lingaraj Temple is the largest and most sacred shrine in Temple City Bhubaneswar. The temple is dedicated to Lord Harihara, which translates to Hari (Lord Vishnu) and Hara (Lord Shiva). The temple is built in the Deula style, with four components: a vimana (sanctum structure), a jagamohana (assembly hall), a natamandira (festival hall), and a bhoga-mandapa (hall of offerings), each increasing in height from its predecessor. The temple complex contains 108 additional shrines and is surrounded by a large compound wall.

Lingaraj Temple Bhubaneswar

According to the Ekamra Purana, a 13th-century Sanskrit treatise, Bhubaneswar is known as the Ekamra Kshetra because the deity of Lingaraja was originally under a mango tree (Ekamra). Unlike most other temples in Bhubaneswar, this temple is active in worship. The temple contains images of Vishnu, possibly as a result of the growing importance of the Jagannath sect, which was founded by the Ganga rulers who built the Jagannath Temple in Puri in the 12th century. Lingaraja, the temple’s central deity, is worshipped as Shiva.

History of Lingaraj Temple

The current temple dates from the last decade of the eleventh century. According to some seventh-century Sanskrit texts, a portion of the temple was built during the sixth century CE. Fergusson believes the temple was founded by Lalat Indu Keshari, who reigned from 615 to 657 CE. The Assembly Hall (jagamohana), sanctum, and temple tower were all constructed in the eleventh century, while the Hall of Offering (bhoga-mandapa) was constructed in the twelfth century. The natamandira was built between 1099 and 1104 CE by Salini’s wife.

Lingaraj Temple Bhubaneswar

The Jagannath (form of Vishnu) sect had been growing in the region by the time the Lingaraja temple was completed, which historians believe is evidenced by the coexistence of Vishnu and Shiva worship at the temple. The Ganga dynasty’s kings were devout followers of Vaishnavism, and they built the Jagannath Temple in Puri in the 12th century. According to some accounts, the temple was built during the 11th century CE by Somavanshi king Yayati I (1025-1040).

The Architecture of Lingaraj Temple

The Lingaraja temple is Bhubaneswar’s largest temple. The temple was rated as “one of the finest examples of purely Hindu temple in India” by James Fergusson (1808-86), a noted critic and historian. It is housed within a large compound wall of laterite that measures 520 feet (160 metres) by 465 feet (142 metres). The wall is 7.5 feet (2.3 metres) thick and is topped by a simple slant coping.

A terrace runs alongside the inner face of the boundary wall to protect the compound wall from outside aggression. The tower stands 45.11 metres (148.0 feet) tall, and the complex’s spacious courtyard contains 150 smaller shrines. Every inch of the 55-meter-tall (180-foot-tall) tower has been sculpted.

Lingaraj Temple Bhubaneswar

The Lingaraja temple is made of sandstone and laterite and faces east. The main entrance is in the east, with smaller entrances in the north and south. The temple is built in the Deula style, with four components: a vimana (sanctum structure), a jagamohana (assembly hall), a natamandira (festival hall), and a bhoga-mandapa (hall of offerings), all in axial alignment and descending height. The dance hall was associated with the growing prominence of the devadasi system at the time. The various units, from the Hall of Offering to the Sanctuary Tower, rise in height.

Lingaraj Temple Bhubaneswar

The bhogamandapa (Hall of Offering) is 42 feet (13 meters)*42 feet (13 metres) on the inside and 56.25 feet (17.15 meters)*56.25 feet (17.15 metres) on the outside, with four doors on each side. The hall’s exterior walls are adorned with decorative sculptures of men and beasts. The pyramidal roof of the hall is made up of several horizontal layers arranged in sets of two with an intervening platform.

Lingaraj Temple Bhubaneswar

Kalasa and lions adorn the inverted bell above the second unit. The Rekha deula is 60 metres (200 feet) tall and measures 22 feet (6.7 meters)*22 feet (6.7 metres) from the inside and 52 feet (16 meters)*52 feet (16 metres) from the outside over the sanctum. It has a decorative design and a seated lion projecting from the walls. From the inside, the sanctum is square. Female figures in various poses are sculpted into the tower walls. The temple has a large courtyard surrounded by hundreds of small shrines.

Important Facts of Lingaraj Temple

  • Lingaraja Temple is a Shiva-dedicated Hindu temple and one of the oldest in Bhubaneswar, the capital of the Indian state of Odisha.
  • The temple is the most visible landmark in Bhubaneswar and one of the state’s most popular tourist destinations.
  • The Lingaraja temple is Bhubaneswar’s largest temple. The temple’s central tower stands 180 feet (55 metres) tall.
  • The temple embodies the essence of Kalinga architecture, concluding the mediaeval stages of the architectural tradition in Bhubaneswar.
  • The temple is thought to have been built by kings of the Somavamsi dynasty, with later additions by Ganga rulers.
  • The temple is built in the Deula style, with four components: a vimana (sanctum structure), a jagamohana (assembly hall), a natamandira (festival hall), and a bhoga-mandapa (hall of offerings), each increasing in height from its predecessor.
  • The temple complex is surrounded by a large compound wall and contains 50 other shrines.
  • According to the Ekamra Purana, a 13th-century Sanskrit treatise, Bhubaneswar is known as the Ekamra Kshetra because the deity of Lingaraja was originally under a mango tree (Ekamra).
  • Unlike most other temples in Bhubaneswar, the temple is active in worship practises, and Shiva is worshipped as Harihara, a combined form of Vishnu and Shiva.
  • The temple contains images of Vishnu, possibly as a result of the growing importance of the Jagannath sect, which was founded by the Ganga rulers who built the Jagannath Temple in Puri in the 12th century.
  • Non-Hindus are not permitted to enter the temple. A platform has been built so that non-Hindus can view the temple from the outside.

Best Time to Visit Lingaraj Temple

This place is very heavenly and spiritual, and you can visit it all year. The best time to visit Lingaraj Temple, however, is during the monsoon and winter seasons. During the monsoon season, this location receives moderate to heavy rainfall, making it appear heavenly with its greenery and bringing freshness elsewhere.

Famous Festivals In Lingaraj Temple

  • Dussehra – Dussehra, also known as Vijayadashmi, is celebrated on the tenth day after Navaratri to commemorate the triumph of good over evil.
  • Shravana: For happiness and wealth, many fasts, offerings, and mantras are performed during the fifth month of the Hindu calendar, known as Shravana.
  • Mahashivaratri is a fasting ritual that takes place in the last week of February. It is reminiscent of Lord Shiva bringing Goddess Parvati with him. A Grand Celebration is arranged by priests and the temple committee.
  • Vaikuntha Ekadashi – Vaikuntha Ekadashi celebrated during the Tamil month of Margazhi (December–January) is the major festival celebrated in the temple.
  • Chitra Poornima is also a major occasion for celebration in the temple.

How to Reach Lingaraj Temple

Bhubaneshwar the capital city of Odisha is well connected by Air, Train, or Road.

By Air: The Lingaraj Temple is about 4.4 kilometres from the Biju Patnaik International Airport, and it takes about 10 minutes to get there by auto rickshaw or taxi.

By Rail: The distance from the Bhubaneswar railway station is approximately 4.8 km and can be easily covered in approximately 12 minutes by taking an auto-rickshaw or taxi service.

By Road:  Tourists can also take local buses or hire a private cab from one of Bhubaneswar’s top car rental companies to get to the Lingaraj Temple Bhubaneswar.

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Closed

Tuesday 6 AM - 7 PM
Saturday 6 AM - 7 PM
Sunday 6 AM - 7 PM
Monday 6 AM - 7 PM
Wednesday 6 AM - 7 PM
Thursday 6 AM - 7 PM
Friday 6 AM - 7 PM
Address: Lingaraj Temple, Lingaraj temple, Lingaraj Temple Road, Lingaraj Nagar, Old Town, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India
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Closed

Tuesday 6 AM - 7 PM
Saturday 6 AM - 7 PM
Sunday 6 AM - 7 PM
Monday 6 AM - 7 PM
Wednesday 6 AM - 7 PM
Thursday 6 AM - 7 PM
Friday 6 AM - 7 PM
Address: Lingaraj Temple, Lingaraj temple, Lingaraj Temple Road, Lingaraj Nagar, Old Town, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India